Celebrating a Hero – Thank you Dad

dads

It is not easy being a dad, any man can father a child, but it takes true character to step up to the plate and assume the multitude of roles included under the umbrella of the term dad.

According to Facebook:

difference between father and dad

A father is not measured by the size of his bank account, or the amount of money he spends on his children. A great number of father’s exist in their children’s lives as mere bank accounts, funneling money for college tuition etc. with little or no effort exerted to actually be a part of their children’s lives.

There are absentee father’s who interact from a distance and disappear into their own world later, believing just by showing up for occasions that they are fulfilling their role as patriarch’s of a family.

 

fatherThere are fathers who, despite living under the same roof as their children, know nothing of them, they are either locked away in a study or planted firmly in front of the TV, or lazing about running some other mindless chore. They seek to gather enough wealth so that their children can lead better lives, without realizing that a better life is within grasp in the present were they to just spend time with their kids. What is the point of having money and an easy life if you are missing such a profound person in your life? Or worse, what is the point of not feeling that that person is as profound as they should be?

Some people go through life having father’s in the house that are supposed to be dad’s but never acted like it, and the greatest tragedy is that when they finally realize what role they should have played, it becomes too little too late. The children are all grown up, spurned and disgruntled, with no preparation on being parents themselves.

Yesterday was my dad’s birthday, and to honor him, I sought to write as to what makes my dad the most special person in my life.

Growing up, my dad was my tutor, my mentor. I learnt a great many lesson from him, both academic and practical. I was never denied anything I wanted, even if I failed to hold up my end of the bargain (the memory that comes to mind is inviting my friends over on the first day of Summer vacation, despite not having achieved the grades we’d agreed upon).

When it came to discipline, I will always remember how my father warned me off of smoking at a young age, he merely told us that he cannot order us not to smoke, all he can do is beseech our education in school to have enlightened us into understanding the hazards of smoking. That trust was enough for me to not touch a cigarette in highschool (I dabbled with the occasional puff of a hookah or a cigar on my birthday during university, the social smoking phase, but am proud to report that to date I have been over 2 years clean of social smoking).

I treasure the memory of my dad teaching me to ride a bicycle, and then the removal of the training wheels at the beach somewhere on the Gulf Road, before it all became commercial space. But most of all I treasure the memory of crying in my dad’s arms when I failed to get the results I had wanted, that he had wanted for me, and he told me it was OK, and that made everything better.

My dad told me that his greatest was investment was in us, in our education. He denied himself a life of luxury in order to ensure we had the best education possible (and great thanks must go to my dear mother for assisting with this burden as well).

In the end, their investment proved worthwhile, for it shaped our character, that of me and my brothers, each in their own right repaying the dividends of that investment.

In closing, a dedication to my dad, my hero:

The greatest gift my dad gave me was the knowledge that with his example, I am not afraid of growing up and becoming a dad. With his guidance, I will strive to be the best dad I can be.

You really are Immortal dad.

Remember, the only person in your life that wants you be truly better than them is your Dad.

Never let this happen to you:

Dad, that went by, Much too fast

Dad, that happened, Much too fast

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